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Police K9 Dog Attacks and Nearly Kills An Innocent Woman By Mistake.

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A Minnesota woman, Desiree Collins, 52, has filed a federal lawsuit against the St. Paul Police Department. She was attacked by a Police K9 dog by mistake and she suffered several bites on her arm and leg. Check it out.

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

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A police dog, known in some English-speaking countries as a “K-9” or “K9” (a homophone of “canine”), is a dog that is specifically trained to assist police and other law-enforcement personnel. Their duties include: searching for drugs and explosives, locating missing people, finding crime scene evidence, and protecting their handlers. Police dogs must remember several verbal cues and hand gestures.[1] The most commonly used breeds are the German Shepherd, Belgian Malinois and Rottweiler. Dogs have been used in law enforcement since the Middle Ages. Money was then ide in the villages for the upkeep of the parish constable’s bloodhounds that were used for hunting down outlaws.[clarification needed] In France, dogs were used in the 14th century in St. Malo.[clarification needed] Bloodhounds used in Scotland were known as “Slough dogs” – the word “Sleuth”, (meaning detective) was derived from this.

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The rapid urbanization of London in the 19th century increased public concern regarding growing lawlessness – a problem that was far too great to be dealt with by the existing law enforcement of the time. As a result, private associations were formed to help combat crime. Night watchmen were employed to guard premises, and were provided with firearms and dogs to protect themselves from criminals. One of the first attempts to use K9s in Policing was in 1889 by the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police of London, Sir Charles Warren. Warren’s repeated failures at identifying and apprehending the serial killer Jack the Ripper had earned him much vilification from the press, including being denounced for not using bloodhounds to track the killer. He soon had two bloodhounds trained for the performance of a simple tracking test from the scene of another of the killer’s crimes. The results were far from satisfactory, with one of the hounds biting the Commissioner and both dogs later running off, requiring a police search to find them.

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It was in Continental Europe that dogs were first used on a large scale. Police in Paris began using dogs against roaming criminal gangs at night, but it was the police department in Ghent, Belgium that introduced the first organized police dog service program in 1899.[5] These methods soon spread to Austria-Hungary and Germany; in the latter the first scientific developments in the field took place with experiments in dog breeding and training. The German police selected the German Shepherd Dog as the ideal breed for police work and opened up the first dog training school in 1920 in Greenheide.[6] The dogs were systematically trained in obedience to their officers and tracking and attacking criminals. In Britain, the North Eastern Railway Police were among the first to use police dogs in 1908 to put a stop to theft from the docks in Hull. By 1910, railway police forces were experimenting with other breeds such as Labrador Retrievers, Doberman Pinschers, and German Shepherds

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